12/1/13

A Few More Paintings by Sidney E. King

 

The house where Jackson died. Guinea Station, VA, May 1863.

Back in July we provided our readers a brief biography of renowned historical artist Sidney E. King along with a few examples of his Civil War art. Since that time we have run across some additional wonderful paintings by King that beg to be shared. All illustrations are courtesy of the National Park Service. Please left click on images for an enlarged view. Enjoy!

The Battle of Drewry's Bluff, May 15, 1862. Confederate batteries in Ft. Darling resist an attempt by Federal gunboats to ascend the James River near Richmond, VA.

The Battle of Drewry’s Bluff, May 15, 1862. Confederate batteries in Ft. Darling resist an attempt by Federal gunboats to ascend the James River near Richmond, VA.

The death of General John Sedgwick at Spotsylvania Court House, VA, May 9, 1862.

The death of General John Sedgwick at Spotsylvania Court House, VA, May 9, 1862.

Lee and his generals watch the opening of the Seven Day's Battles from Chickahominy Bluff overlooking Mechanicsville, VA, June 26, 1862.

Lee and his generals watch the opening of the Seven Day’s Battles from Chickahominy Bluff overlooking Mechanicsville, VA, June 26, 1862.

The Battle of Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862. Confederate gunners on Willis Hill pound away at attacking Union columns.

The Battle of Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862. Confederate gunners on Willis Hill pound away at attacking Union columns.

By Bob Williams

09/12/13

Update From Greg Mast on “State Troops and Volunteers, Volume II”

I have received several inquiries of late about the status of State Troops and Volunteers. I can report that after sustaining a few “bumps in the road ” I have been making excellent progress on Volume 2 the past few months, and I expect that progress to continue for the foreseeable future. However, I am not about to issue any predictions, because the book is not completed and I do not know exactly when it will be.

That said, I do encourage any who have, or know of, an image you would like to place in Volume 2, to please contact me fairly soon. When you do so, I will need you to provide some kind of copy of the image: a photocopy, a cell phone picture, a quick scan etc. (but not, under any circumstances, the original image itself!). An excellent high-resolution copy will be needed for publication, but that can wait a bit, if necessary.

I should add that many photographs in Volume 2 will be in color.

Here is what I am looking for:

Photographs of North Carolina soldiers, sailors, and marines that can be dated ca. 1847 to ca. 1867. Uniformed images are desired, but civilian-clad images of soldiers and sailors are acceptable, particularly if the subjects are armed or died in service. Obviously the vast majority of such images are of Confederates, but there are other categories:
–antebellum militiamen
–N.C. soldiers and sailors in the antebellum U.S. Army and Navy, including Mexican War service
–Federal soldiers and sailors from North Carolina who served during the Civil War (I have located about 50 so far, rather more than I thought I would find).

In Volume 1 of State Troops and Volunteers I published several civilian images: fathers, mothers, wives, and children of the soldiers. It is unclear if there will be room for that kind of photograph in Volume 2.

Please do not submit post-war family pictures of the veterans. I can never use them. I do plan a short final chapter of veterans in the context of veteran activities, principally at reunions. I will consider additional such images, but it is very likely that I already have more than I can use. Kindly left click on image for larger view of flyer.

By Greg Mast

Confed Veteran Ad-color2a

03/23/13

Original Diary of Unknown 26th NCT Soldier

Diary IIn February of 2011, the Society for the Preservation of the 26th Regiment North Carolina Troops received the gift of a unique artifact carried by an original member of the regiment. This item, a leather-bound soldier’s pocket diary belonging to an early enlistee of Company A, was generously sent to Col. Skip Smith by Mr. Paul Butler of Wichita, KS. Also included with the diary was a small gem cameo bearing the photograph likeness of a young woman named Lotta.

Mr. Butler relates his acquisition of the diary as follows: “The diary was originally found by Larry Kaufman of Derby, Kansas. He said that he found the diary with the gem tintype cameo tucked inside it about 5 years ago at an estate sale here in Wichita. It was in the bottom of a box of other papers. There were no other documents with this whatsoever. He purchased it for less than five dollars. Over the last 5 years he tried to transcribe it to the best of his ability. About 3 or 4 months ago he gave it to me. I had a lot of fun transcribing it as I am a history buff, with the Civil War being a point of particular interest for me. As soon as I realized what regiment it was from I really got excited, because of the huge part that I knew the 26th figured in during the war. At that point I went to your website and you all know the rest.”

While there is no soldier’s name inscribed inside the diary, the “Jeff Davis Mountaineer Riflemen” are mentioned several times in various entries. Mr. Butler was keen enough to research and identify that organization as Company A of the 26th NCT. The diary measures approximately 3 by 4 and ¾ inches and is in excellent condition. Unfortunately, the owner’s entries are limited and end in early 1862. Annotations are made in both pencil and ink, often with a draft pencil entry followed later with a final inked version.

At Col. Smith’s request I made an effort to decipher the various entries. For ease of readability I have eliminated redundant passages and restructured them, where reasonable, into some sort of date sequence. I have also taken the liberty of minor spelling editing. In other words, the flow of the diary has been considerably changed but the basic content has not. I also added the full text of the Biblical verses cited by the writer herein since they provide an interesting context on sermons of that period.Diary III

ENTRIES BEGIN

May the 18th 1861 I volunteer for 12 months.

June the 24th 1861 I enrolled my name. Mustered into service of the State of North Carolina as 12 months volunteers.

June the 29th 1861 Received a bounty of ten dollars.

June the 30th I hear a sermon [illegible] from 2 Corinthians 4 chapter no. 17 verse. [“For our light and momentary troubles are achieving for us an eternal glory that far outweighs them all.”]

June the 15th 1861 the Jeff Davis Mountaineers Riflemen leave Jefferson for Raleigh. Arrive at Statesville the 17th in the morning. Leave Statesville in the evening at 4 o’clock. Arrive at Salisbury in the evening took up camp for the night. Leave Salisbury at 8 o’clock the morning the 18th. Arrive at Raleigh in the evening at 11 o’clock. Sunday the 29th a sermon from Revelations the 19th Chapter and 11th verse [“I saw heaven standing open and there before me was a white horse whose rider is called Faithful and True. With justice he judges and makes war.”].

Took up camp on north side of Raleigh and remained there until July the 6th 1861 and then remained two miles north of Raleigh to Camp Carolina.

September the 2nd 1861 the J.D.M.R. left Raleigh. Moved to Morehead City the same day. Took up camp the [illegible]. Friday the 6th moved over the sound to Bogue Island. Wednesday the 12th moved back across the sound to Carolina City. Took up camp the same day in the evening.

October the 10th the Jeff Davis Mountain Rifles moved back to Bogue Island from Carolina City. Took up camp remained there until the present day.

Leave Camp Wilkes November the 29th 1861 arrive at banks [?] the same day took up camp.

Leave Camp Vance January the 27th took camp at Camp Branch the same day.

END OF ENTRIES

Lotta IIn an effort to possibly identify our “forgotten soldier” based upon key dates or other diary entries, fellow Society members Clint Johnson and Greg Mast helpfully reviewed 26th muster roles, Ashe County census records, and probed other sources. Thus far, it has proved impossible to pin point with any degree of certainty one particular soldier. Clint even sought the help of local Ashe County genealogical researcher Sandy Lassen who went to yeoman lengths in this “serendipitous journey” (as she called it) to identify Lotta in the gem cameo. While a couple of “Charlottes” emerge as possibilities for the woman in the picture, no substantive links to a 26th NCT member emerge.

Did the writer of this pocket diary die early in his service leaving his war story unfinished? Or, was it a souvenir pilfered by some Federal soldier following the 26th’s loss of all its baggage, knapsacks, and haversacks in the March 1862 Battle of New Bern? What was the relationship of Lotta to the young man? For the time being, these questions remain unanswered. One thing is certain, however. Thanks to the unqualified kindnesses of both Messrs. Kaufmann and Butler of Kansas this treasured memento of the regiment now appropriately resides among other valued artifacts in the Society’s permanent 26th North Carolina Troops collection.

by Bob Williams